Last night after work. I set up my target in the garden to shoot a few ends before it got dark.  As usual, the first few arrows went in the middle, and as usual I thought ‘Ooh, I’m on to something  good here!’.  And then, as usual, things went down hill and I ended up shooting a distinctly average Worcester score of about 260/300.

I tend to use a target face until it’s shot to pieces.  My current one has about 250 arrow holes in it.  Normally, I evaluate each arrow as I draw it from the target. ‘That one’s in the middle so it was good, that one is nowhere near the middle so it was rubbish’.  Perhaps you probably do something similar.  This time it occurred to me to look not just at individual arrow holes but at the pattern of all the holes left in the target.  The pattern looked something like the picture on the left below.  The centre of the group is not in the middle (which on a Worcester face scores 5), but in the next ring out, somewhere round the 7 o’clock position.

So I adjusted my sights!

Tonight I went into the garden to shoot, and once again I plotted my arrows.  The group is about the same size but its in a different place.  This time the ‘average arrow’ – the centre of the group – is bang in the middle.

I scored 281.  That’s the second best Worcester score I’ve ever had, and equates to a Portsmouth of about 566.

The lesson is, don’t read too much into single arrows.  Shoot a load of arrows (at least 60), plot them on a chart, then work out where the middle of the group lies.  If its not in the middle, then adjust your sights.

Free points.  Your welcome!

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